Dr. Ira Kirschenbaum Explains Why People Are Needing Knee Replacement Surgery At Ever Younger Ages

Dr. Ira Kirschenbaum, a leading orthopedic surgeon, says that obesity is one of the main causes of people’s knees and hips breaking down at younger ages than they had in the past. He points to a study that the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeon recently conducted. The average age of people who need these types of surgeries dropped to 65 from 66 in just one year.

He is the director of orthopeadics at Bronxcare Health System. Dr. Ira Kirschenbaum regularly performs knee and joint replacement surgery in addition to shoulder surgery. He says that just 10 pounds of weight can cause a lot of damage to joints. Every excess pound a person weight puts an extra four pounds of pressure on their knees and hips. Their joints are compressed too much which causes the cartilage and other soft tissues to wear away leading to surgery.

He gives people an experiment to try. Dr. Ira Kirschenbaum says to pick up something weighing 10 pounds and walk around with it. Notice the feeling in your knees and feel how there is extra pressure on them. This is why after people lose some weight they will say they, “Feel so light on my feet”.

Dr. Ira Kirschenbaum says that surgery doesn’t always need to be the answer, though, and he will often recommend other interventions. This can include eating a better diet, getting more exercise, or doing specific exercise to help joints. He will also sometime recommend to his patients that they change their work habits.

He is a nationally recognized expert when it comes to orthopedics. Dr. Ira Kirschenbaum has been an orthopedic surgeon since 1991. Additionally, he lectures on this subject at medical schools. He is also very involved in other industries such as information technology.

Book an appointment to see Dr. Ira here https://www.md.com/doctor/ira-h-kirschenbaum-md

Capitol Anesthesiologists Associates Make Surgery Bearable for Kids

When Mark Stratton, 12, started having mild abdominal pains after meals, his mother, Julie, wanted to give it a while to see if it would resolve on its own. Julie was worried that another trip to the doctor’s office could mean huge medical bills that she couldn’t pay. But after the pain persisted for two weeks, it was clear they needed to see a doctor.

They were directed to Dell Children’s Medical Center. After waiting for what seemed like an eternity, the doctor emerged with the news no parent wants to hear – Mark had a rare form of pancreatic cancer called islet cell carcinoma. “At first I was devastated”, she said. “But the doctor quickly reassured us that this was a highly treatable form of cancer”. But Mark would need to undergo a major operation, referred to as the Whipple procedure. “The thing I worried most about was the pain. They had to open him up, god I didn’t want to think about that”, she says, holding back tears.

Luckily, Julie was connected with a team of anesthesiologists from the Capitol Anesthesiologist Association. They assured her that with a professional team carefully administering the agent Propofol, that Mark would be unaware of anything during the operation.

The operation was a huge success.

“I was really scared”, said Mark. But when asked if he was in a lot of pain, he said, “yeah, but mostly when I got home and didn’t take my pain meds”.

Today Mark is cancer free and both he and Julie are grateful for the expert services of the Capitol Anesthesiology Association.