Jeunesse Global Receives Top Award For Best Place To Work

Is your employer one of the best places to work in its industry? It is a difficult title to earn, but some companies do it better than others. You can tell when a company is really going out of its way to try to make things right for their employees. The employees are just happier in general, and it stands out. 

Jeunesse Global has one again been honored as a top place to work in direct sales by Direct Selling News. It is an industry publication that seeks to spotlight the things that are going on throughout the industry. They like to try to point out some businesses that are going above and beyond for their employees. 

The survey itself is a pretty labor intensive undertaking that requires that Direct Selling News teams up with another firm to collect the data and tabulate the results. They want to make sure that they get all of the facts and figures just right, and they can only do this by working together. 

A completely anonymous survey is given to employees of various direct selling companies. Those employees are asked to fill them out and give their honest opinions about the employers that they work for. An employer must have at least a certain number of employees fill out the survey and return it before they can even be considered for the competition. When this happens, the results are calculated and the winners are announced. 

Jeunesse Global executives had a few words to say about how they have tried to establish the company as a place that is family-oriented and focused on making the work life of their employees the best that it can be. It is not an easy job and no one ever claimed that it would be, but Jeunesse Global cares deeply about creating a great experience for everyone who deals with them from employees to the customers that they serve. 

The bottom line is that this is a company that consistently wins these types of awards, and they are well deserved according to the work that they do. 

https://www.glassdoor.com/Overview/Working-at-Jeunesse-EI_IE613653.11,19.htm

Alastair Borthwick Shares The Beauty Of The Human Experience

At only 16 years of age, Alastair Borthwick began a career in journalism by leaving high school to start working for a small, local paper known as the Evening Times. While working for this paper, he held the position of copy taker before moving on to a slightly larger publication known as The Glasgow Weekly Herald. While working at the Glasgow Herald, he began writing for various columns and features of the paper but started to get a following for the pieces that he was writing for their column known as “Open Air”. Alastair Borthwick had discovered an interest in the sport of climbing. In particular, he enjoyed being able to climb the rolling hills of his home country of Scotland, but he also found himself traveling to other parts of Europe to find what the world would bring him.

While the sport of climbing was something that enthralled Alastair Borthwick until he passed away in 2003, he found himself enjoying the people that were part of the experience as well. In fact, it was the experiences that he had with the rest of the people hiking through the countryside that left the biggest impact on the beloved writer. The book Always a Little Further collected the different pieces that he had written for the “Open Air” column while working for The Glasgow Weekly Herald on the subject of climbing. Always a Little Further was first published in the year 1939 and is considered a classic of the genre.

Readers of today still enjoy the works of Alastair Borthwick which includes not just Always a Little Further, but also a work that was first released under the name Sans Peur. Sans Peur shared the experiences that Alastair Borthwick had while serving his country during World War II. While war is a horrifying experience, it also brings out the best in humanity as well. The friendships and brotherhood that forms during times of war is something that cannot be compared to anything else and he was able to share this with the world.

https://www.theguardian.com/news/2003/oct/09/guardianobituaries.booksobituaries