The Life and Career of Dr. Walden

Being named as one of the 24 best beauty surgeons within the United States in Harper’s Bazaar magazine, and has been known as a women who is an acknowledged leader within her field, and she has trained with some of the best cosmetic surgeons of New York City, where she established a successful practice in Manhattan prior to returning to her hometown of Austin. She is one of the only women to ever be on the board of directors for the American Society for Aesthetic Plastic Surgery, which is a board that she currently serves on. She is also an award-winning surgeon and a published
author. Dr. Walden has also been known as beautiful, brilliant and successful, and is friendly and warm, and is able to put people at ease with her relaxed manner and calm confidence.

At the start of her career following her residency with the University of Texas Medical Branch, Dr. Walden began a fellowship as an aesthetic surgery at Manhattan Eye, Ear and Throat Hospital, that was led by Sherrell Anston who was the department chairman. Following the end of her fellowship, and had worked in New York City’s Upper East Side for the next seven and a half years. During her time in New York, she participated in clinical trials that have led to the reintroduction of the silicone breast implants.

In Jennifer Walden early life, Walden was born in Austin, Texas to a father who was a dentist and a mother who was a surgical nurse. After graduating from Anderson High School, she gained her undergraduate degree from the University of Texas in Biology. She then applied to the medical school at the University of Texas Medical Branch. And as she was originally on the wait list for the university, she eventually graduated as salutatorian in her class. And in her home life, Dr. Walden is a mother to twin son’s, and also has several siblings who are successful within their own fields. Dr. Walden has said that being a mother is what inspires her on a day to day basis.

 

Find out more about Dr. Jennifer Walden:

http://www.venustreatments.com/dr-jennifer-walden/

 

It’s Possible To Make Money Blowing The Whistle

The SEC, or Securities and Exchange Commission, had a gentleman by the name of Jordan A. Thomas acting as Assistant Director some years ago. He also functioned in capacity as the Assistant Chief Litigation Counsel. He performed his duties as Assistant Chief for the Division of Enforcement within the SEC. During his time occupying such duties, Thomas wrote legislation which would eventually become an act passed by congress in 2010. Called the Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act, this legislation protects whistleblowers from employer recriminations after the fact. It also ensures they receive a fair incentive for their efforts in the form of between ten and thirty percent of recovered monetary sanctions. Additional recovery of sanctions leads to additional incentives.

There is, however, one downside. If a whistleblower wishes to go it alone, as the saying goes, and attempt to blow the whistle without any kind of legal representation, their reputation could take a hit. Even though jobs and incentives can be maintained, there’s no way to legislate the attitude of coworkers toward a person perceived as an informant. The best way to preserve one’s reputation is to seek legal counsel. This way the SEC Whistleblower lawyers can fight the battle in court, and the person responsible for initiating it doesn’t have to take center stage.

Their specific aim is to get you the greatest possible employment protection coupled with the highest possible return on incentives. If you do well on incentives, they do well on incentives; this guarantees you’ll get the most possible in such an arrangement. Additionally, this legal practice is led by Jordan A. Thomas, the man who pioneered Dodd-Frank in the first place. After his work at the SEC was successful in enacting the legislation, he immediately switched gears and began to help clients directly.

The measures enacted under Dodd-Frank are some of the most reconstructive and extensive since measures seen in the wake of the Great Depression. If whistleblowers can latch on to the new advantages that go hand-in-hand with those measures, it’s very likely that further negative economic choices made in an underhanded way by people running businesses and corporations may be substantively curtailed. Such changes take time, but with cogent legal representation following well-considered legislation, progression is possible.